Collections

 

THE COLLECTION of the Heritage Farmstead Museum contains 10,000 objects and archival materials. These objects relate to Blackland Prairie life in North Texas from the Victorian Era in 1890 to 1920. The collection is used to furnish the Museum’s historic buildings and is protected and preserved for the purpose of scholarly study. .

Tools and Implements

Tools for all kinds of craftwork were part of daily life on Blackland Prairie Farms in North Texas. We have on display: farming tools and equipment; curing tools; livestock management tools; and potting tools and equipment. The HFM also has a working blacksmith’s shed to show and demonstrate the trade and tools of a blacksmith shop in Victorian Era North Texas.

Furnishings and Domestic Accessories

The HFM has a variety of furniture and domestic items from the Victorian Era. All items, if not belonged to the Farrell-Wilson’s, belonged to other prominent Plano family members from the time period or are Victorian Era replicas. Some notable items include: a William Morris chair, a leader in the Arts and Crafts Movement; a Sanger Bros. Victrola; various irons from the 1800’s through the early 1900’s; and an early telephone from The American Bell Telephone Company.

Library

The HFM library consists of books containing information about the history of: Plano, North Texas, Blackland Prairie life, Texas and Native Americans in the Texas region. Additionally, other subjects include: Victorian Era, Victorian Dress, Victorian Era gardens, antiques, American Windmills, children’s books, and much more.

Textiles and Costumes

The Heritage Farmstead has a large collection of Victorian era textiles, as well as, Victorian era appropriate costumes.

Young House

The Young House was built by one of Plano’s original settler families, the Sam Young family, who moved to the area from Illinois in the 1840s. Interestingly, it exhibits building techniques and materials of a time period earlier than the 1880s. Raised up on bois d’arc posts, the Young House can be considered a late example of the Gothic Victorian three-gable style, very basic but still considered grand for its time and place. Gladys Young, the last inhabitant of the home and daughter of its builder, lived in the Young House her entire 94 years without the benefit of indoor plumbing. Electricity was run to the home only a few years before Gladys Young passed away in 1998.

Virtual Tour